Going through the link profiles of sites I optimised 5 years ago, I’m like…

thisseolife:

“This “Internet Explorer cannot display the webpage” text would look better in red on a gray background.”
I’ve never seen an example of the Google knowledge graph like this. It’s pulling data from somewhere besides wikipedia. Pretty soon people won’t have to leave Google for their answers- which is really what they want.

I’ve never seen an example of the Google knowledge graph like this. It’s pulling data from somewhere besides wikipedia. Pretty soon people won’t have to leave Google for their answers- which is really what they want.

ProductCamp (#pcampclt) from an SEO perspective

I love going to conferences like this. I like the barcamp model to topic selection (even if my pitch isn’t selected). I enjoy meeting new people. I enjoy learning from different perspectives.

That was the best part of ProductCamp CLT for me.

It’s easy for me to get so focused on digital marketing and lead gen that I loose the larger perspective of products and marketing. My clients are involved in this, but it often inherit a product (and sometimes a marketing plan) and am told: market this on the search engines.

ProductCamp helped me:
1. Broaden my (sometimes narrow) view of marketing
2. Empathize with some of the larger struggles of some of my clients
3. Learn that marketers of all types (from branding to SEO) all have similar struggles
4. Learn to see things from a different perspective
5. See how much I don’t know

How to deliver on a project even when your team doesn’t report to you #pcampclt

How? Leadership. Leadership is influence. How do you influence people?

People want three basic things:
1. People want to know you care for them. They never forget how you make them feel. 
2. People want to know you can help them. Look for opportunities to help others. 
3. People want to know they can trust you. We judge ourselves by intent. They judge us by outcome. 

Since most people are bad at these things, all you need to do is be better at them than others in order to influence others and be a good leader.

How to deliver on a project even when your team doesn’t report to you #pcampclt

How? Leadership. Leadership is influence. How do you influence people?

People want three basic things:
1. People want to know you care for them. They never forget how you make them feel.
2. People want to know you can help them. Look for opportunities to help others.
3. People want to know they can trust you. We judge ourselves by intent. They judge us by outcome.

Since most people are bad at these things, all you need to do is be better at them than others in order to influence others and be a good leader.

Hacking Product Management with Crowdsourcing and Outsourcing #pcampclt

Why outsource?
Product managers are jacks of all trades but not necessarily good at all things. You want to do the things for which you have high ability and high challenges, not the things you have low ability or don’t challenge you. 

Examples of tasks that can be outsourced: tedious tasks (using odesk or a virtual assistant), market research (using a virtual assistant), user field testing (gigwalk or odesk), data search cleansing and enrichment (mechanical turk), rapid prototyping (odesk), etc. 

Odesk essentials:
*Don’t just hire cheap labor, you get what you pay for. Instead, hire only what you need. 
*Hire 3 workers to do your first step, keep the one that did the job best.
*Hire a team that never sleeps. 
 *Send sales the bill for that critical custom app. 

Tips and tricks:
*use odesk as easy way to hire and pay local vendors
*don’t start with things that are mission-critical
*find a goof video guy
*prime the pump with mechanical Turk for brainstorming
*test the waters for a VA with a concierge (often available through your AMEX card, etc)

Hacking Product Management with Crowdsourcing and Outsourcing #pcampclt

Why outsource?
Product managers are jacks of all trades but not necessarily good at all things. You want to do the things for which you have high ability and high challenges, not the things you have low ability or don’t challenge you.

Examples of tasks that can be outsourced: tedious tasks (using odesk or a virtual assistant), market research (using a virtual assistant), user field testing (gigwalk or odesk), data search cleansing and enrichment (mechanical turk), rapid prototyping (odesk), etc.

Odesk essentials:
*Don’t just hire cheap labor, you get what you pay for. Instead, hire only what you need.
*Hire 3 workers to do your first step, keep the one that did the job best.
*Hire a team that never sleeps.
*Send sales the bill for that critical custom app.

Tips and tricks:
*use odesk as easy way to hire and pay local vendors
*don’t start with things that are mission-critical
*find a goof video guy
*prime the pump with mechanical Turk for brainstorming
*test the waters for a VA with a concierge (often available through your AMEX card, etc)

Marketing Starts at the Idea Stage #pcampclt

Sometimes there is a gap between product and marketing. If you start with a foundation of learning, you’ll answer your marketing questions ahead of time.

The first P of marketing is “product”. If you’re in product development, your in marketing. Product managers should be doing prod dev and marketing at the same time.

Empathy is important in prod development. “The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well that the product sells itself.” - Peter Drucker.

Empathy mapping is a great way of finding this: What is a customer thinking about your product? Feel? See? Hearing? Doing? Saying? (See pic #2)

This exercise will help you determine pains (what challenges?) and gains (what do they hope to achieve?). From there you know how to market your product.

Concluding points #pcampclt

Concluding points #pcampclt

The 4 Don’ts of Product Management #pcampclt

1. Don’t encourage your plumber to keep photos of you on their iPhone
*do identify and talk to each persona
*do understand the weight of each persona
*do consider the interplay

2. Don’t loose sight of the business goals 
*do balance user needs with business drivers
*the best thing for your users is not always the obvious thing
*do question what is commonplace
(This is an excellent point)

3. Don’t take it personal if someone gets slapped during user testing
*do give users tasks to complete and see if they complete them
*do remain objective
*do embrace frustration

4. Don’t solve problems you don’t have
*do start with the simple problems
*do validate incrementally
*do gradually introduce complexity
(Another excellent point)

The 4 Don’ts of Product Management #pcampclt

1. Don’t encourage your plumber to keep photos of you on their iPhone
*do identify and talk to each persona
*do understand the weight of each persona
*do consider the interplay

2. Don’t loose sight of the business goals
*do balance user needs with business drivers
*the best thing for your users is not always the obvious thing
*do question what is commonplace
(This is an excellent point)

3. Don’t take it personal if someone gets slapped during user testing
*do give users tasks to complete and see if they complete them
*do remain objective
*do embrace frustration

4. Don’t solve problems you don’t have
*do start with the simple problems
*do validate incrementally
*do gradually introduce complexity
(Another excellent point)